Sunday, 18 March 2012

I Made My Own Dress Form!

Here she is!  My paper-tape double!  Woohoo! 

Can you tell which one is the real me?

Wow, I’m so happy this worked!  This is a great way to get a dress form without having to spend hundreds of dollars, and the best part is it replicates your unique body shape!  All of the mannequins I’ve looked at have a bust that is still bigger than mine at their smallest measurement, and I am no expert on mannequins but I think you’d probably be hard-pressed to find one with a sway back!

I researched this method of making a dress form on the internet quite a lot, and I found most of the information I found glossed over some of the aspects I wanted to know about.  So I thought I might just make a mini tutorial about what I’ve learned!  And here it is!
 

It was quite fun to make (well, mainly after I’d gotten out of my papery prison- that bit wasn’t so fun)- it sort of took me back to school days where you’d get to make papier mache projects!

Well, shall we get started?
Here’s what you will need:
-paper tape*
-scissors
-garbage bag or thin t-shirt you don't mind cutting up
-masking/duct tape 
-newspapers/fabric scraps/stuffing
-jandals- Americans call these flip flops?
-sponge 
-thick cardboard
-blow drier (optional)
-an awesome husband or helper

*Most of the information was very vague about the kind of tape- I finally found the right stuff and what it is called.  It is referred to as "water activated tape" or "gummed paper tape".  It it used for sealing up boxes and holding down paper for watercolour painting.  I found mine at an art supply store.  I got 150m by 35mm.  I still had plenty left at the end.


Some ideas if you want to make a stand:
-sturdy wooden coathanger, plus one of the following options:
     -pvc pipe or cardboard tube with christmas tree stand to hold it up
     -an op shop (thrift store) standing lamp
     -anything else you might have that has a pole with a base really!

Total cost of supplies was $17.60 for the paper tape, and about $1 for the bin liner, that's about $15 US all up.  Not bad! :)

Alright, let's get started!  You'll want to set aside a few hours.

Step 1: Tie up your hair, and use the bathroom (don't think I need to explain these!).  Another good thing to do is cut up a lot of strips in advance.  I didn't take my own advice because I was unsure of what length to make them, so here's what I'd advise:  You don't need to worry, just cut a lot of varying lengths, you WILL use them.  I would recommend mainly strips of about 40cm (16 inches), and ranging up to 60cm (24 inches).  This will save you lots of time- trust me, you want to make the wrapping part as fast as possible!

Step 2:  Wear a bra that you would normally wear under your clothing.  Also, wear close fitting leggings too.  I just went for underwear since I don't mind my husband seeing! :)  Now, put on your jandals (these just cushion your feet since you'll be standing a long time) and don your garbage bag (okay mine was technically a "bin liner" if that makes a difference)!  Obviously it didn't fit me like a glove, so I just hacked and slashed and taped at it with my husband until it fit nice and closely.  Then we just cut and taped more bits over any gaps that were left, as well as putting a strip of tape under the bust just to make sure that was nice and tight.  Don't forget to tape around your neck, and make sure it goes low enough- mine was only just long enough.  Let's get personal, internet:  Here is a picture of me wearing a sweaty garbage bag.

Apparently I have no shame?  That's so weird, I thought I did!
Step 3:  Start taping!  Your helper takes the helm here!  Your job is to stand still for now.  We had a bowl of water set up, as well as the sponge and a baking tray (or any surface that will be suitable for wetting the tape on).  You dunk the sponge in the water, squeeze out the excess and swipe it over the tape strip getting it nice and wet and sticky.  First we did some diagonal strips from the shoulder across the chest and over the bust.  Slightly overlap the tape strips on each other.  Then we moved onto defining the waist with horizontal strips.  Don't over-think it though, you will be able to see the logical progression, and you can't do it "wrong" as long as you follow the body's contours.  Diagonals work well in curved areas like around the shoulders and chest.  Here I am after the first layer:

Trying to smile but getting pretty uncomfortable!
The back
 Let's be honest- this thing is NOT comfortable to be in.  I had to grin and bear it but being constrained like this for a long time is not good for you.  Plus, the stinky glue and sweaty garbage bag don't help.  Hah, by the end of it I was talking like a dying person,  my husband couldn't wait to cut me out!

Make sure you tape down to where you need- err on the side of too long versus too short.  You can always cut it shorter but you can't cut it longer.  Mine goes down to about just below where a top would end, which is a good length.  A bit of extra length wouldn't hurt though.  

We were planning to do 2 or 3 layers, but we only ended up doing almost 2.  That was plenty strong though.  As long as the main areas are nice and thick, you can add more tape after it's off!  If yours is quite wet you may need a hairdryer between layers but we didn't need it at all.

Step 4:  Good advice is to mark centre front and centre back, as well as the waistline, before you take it off.  Again I didn't take my own advice.  I figured I could tell pretty easily after it was off, so it was fine :)  What is important though, is to mark the bottom of your dress form all the way around.  Do this an even length from the ground.  This ensures your dress form will be able to sit in a way that mimics your posture- you don't want clothes hanging off it crookedly after all that work!

Step 5:  When the tape is hard enough to keep its shape but still soft enough to get out of, get your helper to cut up the centre back with scissors.  Careful not to stab the skin or cut through the bra strap!  Shimmy out of there, you're free!  Ahhhh, sweet relief!

Now is a good time to put any support items you might like in there.  I have read that for larger busts, shoulder pads are good to put in to stop them collapsing over time.  A wooden coat hanger supports the shoulders, and can be used for hanging, or you can attach your pole to it for part of the stand.  I did none of these things :)

Tape up the back with your duct/masking tape.
At this point, I gave a quick measure and was pleased to discover it was the right size!  It was only about 0.5cm off- that's pretty accurate!  If yours ends up bigger, you can cut vertical slits, pull them tighter and tape till it's the right size.

Step 6:  Do some more layers of tape wherever it looks thin or needs smoothing over, and cover over your tape job at centre back.  I especially focused on the armholes, neck and base, where I wrapped tape to the inside, for extra support, and to make the edges nice and smoothly rounded.


Here is a tip for getting the tape to sit nicely over curved areas- obviously don't worry about doing this when there's a person inside, it'll take too long!  This was my perfectionist side coming out.
See how it stubbornly won't lie flat?
Give it a snip with the scissors
Press it down and it'll lie flat- yup, it's just like snipping curves in sewing!
Step 7:  Trace around the base onto the cardboard.  Cut out cardboard to cover the neck, armholes and base (I just eyedballed the small holes since they are hard to trace).  Cut a hole in the bottom of the base if you're using a stand, and insert the stand.  Tape up the neck, then stuff firmly:
Tape up the rest of the holes, and give them a layer of the paper tape afterwards so they look nice!

...Wait, hang on a minute!  I think we're done!  Now celebrate!!  (Clean up tomorrow! lol!)

Woohoooooo!!!  Finished!
I'm very happy with my body double.  She may have a few funny lumps and bumps here and there, but I love her!  And of course I owe a huge thanks to my husband for helping so much with this wacky project, he is a GEM!

Additional resources:
-This video shows the basics for if you're not sure, and shows a stand option.
-This webpage from Threads magazine shows a bunch of different options for DIY dress forms, as well as some nice in-progress shots.
 
 Wow, this tutorial took me a long time to write, I really hope someone benefits from it.  The only problem is..  now I have no excuse for poorly fitting garments, oh no!

If you do make a dress form from this tutorial, I'd love to see it!  Send me a picture or a link by emails or in the comments! :)  (My email is in my profile.)

77 comments:

  1. Wow, that is so cool! I haven't seen it done that way before - I've always seen it done with duct tape. I think this will help you a LOT in your adjustments!

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  2. Thanks for being "brave" enough to share this with us! It is a great system, and I may give it a go myself.

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  3. It looks great!! Have you had a chance to use it yet? I haven't gotten to use mine just yet but I plan to this week sometime. Following your blog and can't wait to see what you do with yours! :)

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  4. I haven't officially used it yet, though I put a muslin on it to see how it looked. But I'll be trying it out pretty soon, I have a lot of fitting to do! :) I'm pleased with how stiff and sturdy it seems to be though! I'll let the blogoverse know if it decides to collapse, lol!

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  5. You did such an excellent job! No more fitting woes?

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  6. I've always wanted to do this! It looks great!

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  7. Replies
    1. And I have nominated you for a Sunshine Award if you care to join in.

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  8. Super tutorial - what a great idea! I am sure this is going to make pattern fitting soooo much easier.

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  9. If you cut it in a zigzag pattern when you take it off, you ensure that you line it up perfectly! I love the this tape better than the duck tape.

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    1. Brilliant idea

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    2. Pinking shears would be great and easy to use. Love the idea! Thanks for sharing! When I make mine, I will definately do that!

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  10. Elegant Eleanor20 March 2012 at 02:15

    I've been searching for a step by step tutotial for a long time, didn't realise you just made yours only this week-end! It looks easy enough for my crafty sister to help me with the paper mummy bandages and this form being made of paper instead of duct tape means she can also personalise it with a layer of paper napkins or other collage using varnish glue...So impatient to start! Thanks a lot.

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    1. Oh! what a fabulous idea! so many possibilities, you could decoupage with scrapbook papar, fabric, lace, anything! Thanks for sharing the idea!

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  11. This is so neat. Thanks for sharing how you did this!

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  12. Congratulations. A dream come true for you and such an easy to follow explanation. It looks professional indeed. Great team work too. Well done.

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  13. Thank you so much. I have throw away a few outfits because afterwards they were too big or too small or just wasn't me. I think the grumpy husband can help me. He likes to pretend he can sew.. LOL.. He calls himself my designer. I allow him to hold the title to give him the big head.. LOL

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  14. Wow, this looks great! I'll have to enlist some help and make one of these! Thanks for sharing!

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  15. This is great! Thanks for your tutorial! This will be very helpful to me. I would like to start sewing, but since I do not know whether I will be successful or not, I have been reluctant about investing into a dress form (it is not only about the money, but then the hassel with trying to sell it makes me tired just thinking about it.....). Yours is even much better than the ones you can buy, because you get an exact shape of your own body with all the individual peculiarities! If I fail as a seamstress, I can just throw it away! If I gain or lose weight, I just make another one! Wonderful!
    P.S. I am happy for you that you finally got over your illness!

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  16. Thanks to all of you for your comments! I'm glad to have inspired some of you :) I would come over and help if I could, lol! It's quite fun!

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  17. YES! YES! I have all the stuff to do it too........now to find some one to help me (snigger) How long did it take to get to 'cut it off' stage?
    I have a very old dressmakers dummy, dressed her in my underwear, padded her up with old cushion fillers measured and measured until she was my shape........almost, like you said "they dont have a sway back" and my Mrs Doubtfire stands ever so straight.But seeing your efforts has inspired me!!

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    1. Hmmm, it was probably an hour to an hour and a half to wrap. But if you take my advice and cut strips beforehand I think it will go much faster! I would highly recommend this as it is NOT comfortable! I was feeling pretty crappy by the end, so glad to get out of that thing! Good luck with your project :)

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  18. I had problems doing the duct tape one. i got claustrophobic and started to hyperventilate. So your experience worries me a little. I wonder if it could be done in two stages--one, the front and later, the back, then put together. Seems like this would eliminate the caged effect. Thoughts?

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    1. Hmmm, I'm sorry to hear of your experience! It's true, it's very restrictive and it doesn't help that you're sort of suffocating a good quantity of skin.

      I think you actually could very well do this in two stages. It turns out quite stiff, so aligning the two halves wouldn't be tooo tricky.

      It would require forethought- maybe marking your skin under your armpits and hips, then transferring that line to each separate half of the dressform before you take them off(if that makes any sense?). That way you would have something to match up.

      Let me know how it goes if you do attempt it, and good luck!

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  19. So very helpful! Thanks for sharing. I'm starting to investigate body double options and this is very helpful.

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  20. Thank u for commenting on my blog and for sharing ur blog :)

    I can't believe u made that dress form! So cool!!!!!

    I have same problem, all dress forms have bigger bust than me, smaller waist.

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  21. If you want to make a really amazing form, think about doing a body cast using alginate or silicone and a plaster mother mold. You could cast it in silicone with a core. This is much more expensive and involved, but it will make an exact cast of your body which will last for many years and never collapse.

    I am a stop motion animator and plan on making forms for my creations (basically doing another casting of the body in the case of bodies cast with plaster molds, or making a mold for bodies which are not cast in the first place).

    I think smaller clothing might be much more difficult to get a good fit, although I do not know for sure, so a custom form might be a big help, especially in visualizing and designing and for fantasy costumes or strange (non-human) shapes.

    While this method looks like a great way to make an inexpensive and relative fast form, I wonder what will happen as time goes by and the newspaper and tape start to age. These papers have a high acid content and will eventually disintegrate. Maybe that won't be a problem because you will want to make a new form as your body changes with age (hopefully not weight flux!).

    Anyway, I enjoyed your tutorial, and the whole process looks great. I would love to see you make a video of the process (if you could stand to go through it a second time). Oh, and give that husband of yours a nice tall cold beer for helping you!

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  22. Thank you! May be I'll do it one day!!! ;-)

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  23. I'm taking a sewing course right now (learning to adjust patterns to really fit) and a dress form would be invaluable. I quizzed my instructor about it, and she spoke of the "paper tape" form she made for herself. However, she's much better at hands-on showing than verbal explanations, so I was left with only the vaguest of notions how to proceed, except to learn that she doesn't like duct tape forms, which were the only home-made kind I'd ever seen. I found this post through the link you left on the Threads site, and it's terrific, exactly what I was looking for! Thank you.

    I will be doing this as soon as I gather my supplies -- and commandeer my 18-year-old daughter. I figure if I do one for her and promise her some nice, custom-fitted clothes, she can do one for me! Mother-daughter bonding through paper tape and sweat. Whee...

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    1. Oh, great! Good luck with yours! :)

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  24. Wow I've never seen this paper tape version before. I did a duct tape one last year and loved using it but found after it layed in the closet for a few months the tape had stretched out and made it bigger than it should be (which I guess is better than it being smaller than it should be, but still, ended up being a huge pain and unfinished project). But this version wouldn't have that problem so I'm really excited to try it. Now I just have to find this paper tape stuff.

    Also, for anyone planning on making a form, take a few minutes to look up some videos on youtube of people making duct tape dummies, the method is the same they just use a different type of tape and it really helps seeing someone doing it and how they go about wrapping the body. And when doing the bust I would suggest to make sure you wrap each breast seperately (I've seen some tutes where they just do it as one big lump) so that if you ever plan on making anything with a wrap-style top you'll be able to get it to drape properly on the dummy, which you can't do if its got a uni-boob.

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  25. What a great idea! I'd never thought of it. I really need a dress form to fit my crocheted garments on.

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  26. Hello, as soon as I read your blog I ran straight to Staples and got me some tape. Came home and enlisted my husband's help. It turned out GREAT! The one thing I noticed however, is that when I measured myself and then the finished dressform, the dressform was an inch and a half bigger under the bust than I am. But I'm thinking that was because I was taking some pretty deep breathes as I was getting taped up. As for the collapsing question people have been discussing. I got some spray foam insulation that you can buy at a hardware store and sprayed the inside (arm holes, neck, boob area, then a pretty thick layer in the cavity) let it dry and stuffed the rest with newspaper. This dressform will NEVER collapse. Thanks for the tutorial, you Rock!

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    1. That's a fantastic idea with the foam.

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  27. love this! looks a lot better than the duct tape versions I've seen.

    great tutorial--not only was it informative, I picked up some New Zealand slang along the way ;) going to wear my jandals tomorrow!

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  28. This is super! I know what my husband and I are doing this weekend. Much better idea than spending hard earned $$ for a dress form you still have to modify. Thanks!

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  29. Danielle Fisher2 May 2012 at 11:42

    I love this idea! I just wonder how stiff it is. I make quite a bit of Civil War clothing and have to have a corset on mine to get the "right contour" for the clothing back then. Would it stand up to a corset?

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    1. Well, it isn't very flexible. I don't know that it would stand up to a corset cinching it in unfortunately. I guess you could make the form over an already corseted person? Could end up a bit bumpy though I suppose..

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    3. I am a 18th century interpreter and seamstress for 18th, 19th and 21th centuries. From the historical seamstress that I know that have made duct tape dress forms, they recommend that you put on your foundation garments(stays-corset-bra)underneath your "bin liner" or t-shirt. So you would need a different dress form for each historical period you need to fitted for. You would not get the same measurements if you tried to corset any dress form.

      I have plans of recruiting both my sister and a fellow historical seamstress. We all need doubles and I think the extra hands could make the process faster. I will post how it works out.

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  30. I enjoyed reading through your blog before attempting to make the paper tape dress form. Thanks for all the details!!

    I used an old tee-shirt as the base layer and was quite comfortable temperature wise. Even with pre-cutting many strips, it took us over 2 hours to do three layers.

    My hubby used small strips until the pre-cut ones ran out then he cut longer ones for the third layer. It may have saved time, but the result isn't as form fitting. Its about 2" larger than I am. So pre-cut all the strips if you've got an 'independent' helper!

    My only question was how long to let it dry before cutting it off. A half hour wasn't nearly enough time. I hung it up on a hanger to dry out overnight and it was still damp the next morning. The form opened up under the tape I used to glue the two sides back together, so I used regular packing tape to hold it together.

    All in all, I love my paper tape dress form. Super cheap, and it'll be compostable when I'm done with it. I started using it 24 hours after completing it, and its fabulous to have my double. Its making fitting much, much easier, and I can live with the extra ease.

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    1. Thanks for letting me know how it went. I'm so glad it worked out well for you! Funny how much slower yours dried. Probably due to the extra layers!

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  31. I love your blog. I have an antique shop but am on a budget and I have one dress form and need another, but am trying to avoid the expense...I'll try to make a second one using the first as a mold.(it's a cute size, i'm a much larger size) :)
    but I think it would be much easier using a dress form than a real person... I'll let you know how it goes... Thanks! Virginia

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  32. Thanks so much for including the link to the tape!

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    1. I am so proud of you (and thankful) that you chose to share. You go girl! I'm going to gather necessary supplies for this and get hubby to help.

      Thanks a million, Ms. Johanna! :-)

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  34. Johanna, I LOVE your hedgie pincusion! I've seen it on PR and plan to make one "someday." First, though, I need clothes, especially pants. Have you or anyone made a pants form? Also, has anyone tried self-adhesive tape? There are several brands; I'd love to hear people's opinions on them.

    I think the almost-fainting issue is caused by the plastic liner, which doesn't let the skin breathe. Remember the original "Goldfinger"? I'd go for the t-shirt liner instead.

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    1. Hmm, I've actually never seen a pants form, but it would be a great idea! I'm sure you could use the same principles! Haha, not sure I'd love seeing a 1:1 scale of my backside and thighs lying around *shudder*, but it sure would be useful!
      Sorry, I don't know anything about the self-adhesive tape- unless you mean duct tape? I have heard it is soft so collapses more easily, and also the glue gets gummy. So paper tape seems to be the way to go. Let me know if you make a pants form!

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  35. Wow! It really works! You're tutorial was so helpful and mine turned out fabulous! Until I can afford a new one it will work nicely :) Thanks!

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  36. I made a duct tape form in two parts several years ago. My friend who was helping wasn't immediately available and I wanted to get started right away. So, I taped myself from the waist down. Once my friend was ready, she taped me from the waist up, and then I put the two pieces together. It worked well, so I don't see why it wouldn't work doing the back and front the same way. I've watched just about every video and read every tutorial on making forms and I have one suggestion to make it a little more comfortable. Tape the breast area and below (down to the waist) last. That will help with the breathing and maybe prevent lightheadness. Also, I would strongly recommend sacrificing a tight fitting t-shirt and a pair of nylons or tights rather than the plastic bag. The bag adds more bulk and will retain the body heat/sweat.

    Thanks for the tutorial. Hope you are doing well with your sewing.

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  37. Great idea - very helpful

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  38. Looks perfect. It is so awesome to see a young person so enthusiastic about sewing. Hope you continue to do so well. Thanks for the great tutorial.

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  39. Oh how I wish I could find a sewing buddy within 5 miles of where I live. I've been thinking of buying one, but I like this better. I'll wait for cooler weather.

    I have a corset pattern that is very similar, except that instead of a plastic bag, you sacrifice a too tight tee-shirt.

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  40. Maybe somebody asked this, but I didn't see it. How do you pin to it? I would assume it's hard. I used to have a Wolf dress form that I could pin to. I'm not sure I'd know what to do if I couldn't pin on it for making custom patterns.

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    1. I just went and stuck a pin in mine, and it was easy. I don't use mine to pin into. It would probably weaken if you pinned in the same spot over and over but I think it would definitely be worth a try to make one for this purpose. Let me know how you go if you do make one!

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  41. Thanks for your tutorial!
    Do you happen to know if reinforced paper tape would be harder to use?

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    1. Hmm, afraid I don't know! I think some tutorials I saw used reinforced tape so I think it would definitely be worth a try! Let me know how it goes if you go ahead with it!

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    2. I read somewhere that you just cover it with a tight knit fabric, and then you pin to the fabric, not the form.

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  42. This is great! I'm struggling with bodice fitting problems at the moment, and I have similar small-bust issues with existing mannequins. How is it going since you finished it? Are you finding that it helps you with the fitting process?

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  43. I have been using it since I finished it and have found it really really helpful! Especially for seeing and fitting the backs of garments, which I couldn't see without twisting (and causing all sorts of red herring wrinkles), or getting someone to take a photo for me to inspect (a huge pain and not ideal).
    There's also a huge benefit to being able to walk around it and see from different angles, as well as being able to play around pinning out chunks of fabric.

    I would definitely recommend it, it has helped me grow in confidence. I've been slacking a bit with my sewing lately but I'll be using this lots more in the future :)

    Oops I went on for a bit but hope this helps :)

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  44. This is a great tutorial! I'm so glad I found it. I found you from a link from Pinterest to Threads Magazine and then your comment brought me here. I really want a dress form but I don't want to pay big bucks for one that won't be an exact match to my body shape. This is the perfect solution!

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  45. Making one this afternoon. Wish me luck!

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  46. I'm making 3. Thanks for the tut!! By the way, we call them sandals as well as flip flops.

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  47. Thank you!! !
    Your tutorial is fantastic!
    I'm going for it!

    Constance

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  48. Ps
    Jo, I just read your bio and so glad to hear that you are feeling well and creative!!

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    1. Good luck with your dress form- send me a pic when you're done if you like! And thanks for your kind words :)

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  49. Hi, Joanna. Found link to your blog from Pinterest. You have a great tutorial. Bright pictures and clear instructions. I featured your post on my new blog. You can visit at http://carolstagsale.blogspot.com/2012/08/making-it-well-i-made-my-own-dress-form.html

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  50. This is amazing! i'm actually just 14 years old and have never sewed before but i've always wanted to make my own clothes. And i've always wanted a dress form since the first time i saw one when i was still very young! i hope i can make it with my mom and learn how to sew. thanks for the great tutorial! any suggestions for beginners?

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    1. Sewing suggestions for beginners? Well start out with a simple cotton fabric since it's easy to sew. And a skirt is a good first project too :) Don't trust the recommended sizing on the envelope- they usually end up too big, trust me! Measure your pattern and compare to your body instead, leaving a bit of extra room for movement (called "ease"). You'll probably go down a size.
      And don't be scared of screwing up. That's what learning is all about. Hope this helps and let me know if you have any more question! :)
      Good luck with sewing and your dress form!

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  51. This is great! Thanks for going to the trouble. I really want a dress form for sewing historical costumes, but to buy one is so expensive! I think I will definitely give this a try! I love inexpensive!

    I did have one question - how should I approach the fact that I will be putting a corset on the dress form? I assume it is NOT squishy like my own body would be, but I'm worried mostly about the bust. If I wear a regular bra to make the form, my chest would be too big. I'm thinking I should wear a sports bra, that way it would take into account my chest being squished by the corset. What do you think?

    Thanks!

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    1. Hmmm yeah, I don't think it would squish the form into a corset very easily.
      Would you think it possible to create the form on top of your body while wearing a corset?

      Ooh either that or- you could cut slits around the form after making it on your normal body, and compress it, re-taping it to make it smaller to mimic your corseted form.
      That way it would capture your shoulders etc. while also getting the corsetted shape..

      Let me know if you do make it!

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    2. I am a 18th century interpreter and seamstress for 18th, 19th and 21th centuries. From the historical seamstress that I know that have made duct tape dress forms, they recommend that you put on your foundation garments(stays-corset-bra)underneath your "bin liner" or t-shirt. So you would need a different dress form for each historical period you need to fitted for. You would not get the same measurements if you tried to corset any dress form.

      I have plans of recruiting both my sister and a fellow historical seamstress. We all need doubles and I think the extra hands could make the process faster. I will post how it works out.

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  52. Thanks so much for sharing your dress form tutorial and it was very brave to get photographed in the bin liner. Hats off to your husband for helping.

    I can't wait to try this as I want a form but "real" ones are way more expensive than my pocketbook will allow.

    Congrats on your road to recovery...may you stay well.

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  53. Johanna, Thanks for your tutorial. It has made me ready to get a few friends together and made our dress forms. I think having one to tape and one to prep the tape will improve the process time. We are historical seamstress and have been planning to make duct tape doubles, but after your post and that in Threads, I thank the paper tape will be the way I go. I plan on making two, one with my stays(18th century corset)on for fitting 18th century gowns and one with my bra for modern sewing. I think the one in stays will be easier because the tape will not constrict anymore than the stays already do.

    I will post how they turn out.

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  54. Thanks for posting this! I know it took a lot of time, but it looks like many people have benefitted from it. I'm going to give this a try with my husbands help.

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